Which NFL QB would you want for the next 10 years:

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Johnny Manziel, Teddy Bridgewater or Blake Bortles?
From the draft this year, we saw some names pop up that got great recognition early on, and we saw names pop out of nowhere later. Johnny Manziel has very good arm strength, loaded up with the natural athletic tools that can potentially become a danger in the NFL. He slings the ball with ease, but, right now it’s very hard to consider him a serious QB in the NFL. Saying things like he needs to ‘take this more seriously’, isn’t helping the cause for him at this point. Granted, if getting his game together, he does have the effortless arm strength to chuck the ball up and down the field. He can make all the throws, using odd angles and straight bombs going deep.
This season Johnny has only been a sideshow for the Browns, and until the Browns decide what they really have out of him, I question if he will be doing much in his career. Johnny is going to be watching, and waiting, unless he gets his act together. We know that his feet are game-changing, he can make people miss with his massive acceleration and explosive cuts to make defenders miss. He can move around and dodge with his instinctive-like athleticism to out-run defenders. Obviously, we know all about Manziel having the great mobility, and his danger to defenses when he is on the run with the constant threat to keep it himself or pass the ball. He also has the nifty ability to dodge tacklers in the pocket and chuck one that goes deep down the field for a big completion. He also is a tough kid, who is not afraid to finish a run. Which could also be a concern. He had proven his onfield leadership skills at the college level, so he was mentally tough, at that point.
 
What I also question for Johnny is his ability to go through his progressions. Looking off defenders, finding his 3rd option when need be, after 1 and 2 are not open, he then tends to move and dance, and scramble. Can he then make the oooh and ahhh play, yes, but can he also get himself into a heap of problems with that, yes. Only time will tell with that. He also has the tendency at times to release the ball while off-balance, which can potentially cause the ball placement to end up in a very tough place to make the grab, which brings to light the possibility that maybe his WRs in college helped him more than many may have thought. We saw that this year with his heave into the endzone vs Cinncinatti that got picked off, and was a terrible decision, welcome to the NFL Johnny.
He needs to focus on football, not the celebrity lifestyle, remember Matt Lienert, I do.
 
Teddy Bridgewater, this year has been a great shining spot for the Vikings that has been proven already like his very strong games vs the Jets and Miami, both top ended defensive teams. In 2011, he was amazing and seemingly came out of nowhere, being named the Big East Rookie of the Year. That season in college Teddy Bridgewater completed 65% of his passes for 2,129 YDs and 14 TDs. Also compiling 265 YDs on the ground running along with 4 TDs as well. He has a mental toughness that doesn’t waiver. He has patient dedication and an internal relentlessness that makes him push himself. He has the smarts and has shown the strong ability to read defenses prior to the snap, which his quick release has shown, and his patience. With his pocket awareness and being able to feel the rush, he has been a very nice find for Minnesota this season.
Teddy has shown an easy and very natural throwing motion when finding his targets. And completing 64.4% of his passes for the Vikes. He has had a soft touch on intermediate throws, and throwing the vertical pass, he had improved greatly, throughout the season, to say the least. He has been as impressive as any rookie QB in the league this season. He has been showing a quick set-up and release, and always places the ball so that his receivers can run after the catch and continue onward and get more yards. With his strong arm he whips the ball with velocity and the soft touch to make any throw. He shows the courage to throw the tough passes even when there are defenders in close proximity to his targets.
Teddy can run and is mobile enough to run when he needs to, 209 and a TD this year. But don’t compare him to running QB’s like Cam, Teddy uses his feet to move through the pocket, not to run. So can he exploit defenses with his feet, yes. Can he read defenses and set up teammates for success, he can do that also. He is smaller, and has suffered some injuries this year, but I think that he is smart enough to learn how to avoid certain situations and to take himself out of harms way if possible in the future.
 
Blake Bortles who has been the prototypical rookie QB for the Jags this year with 2908 YDs, 11 TDs and his 58.9% passing completion pct has been decent. He still obviously needs to continue his development as a pocket passer. He has the tendency to be hit or miss where he has the games like his 14-33 passing game vs Houston and games like 32-46 and 336 vs the Titans, when he fires the ball.
He may not throw the prettiest ball in the game, and has sometimes, struggled with late delivery.
Playing best when he feels protected in the pocket, and has some time to step into his throws and deliver. He obviously has the perfect NFL-caliber frame at 6-5 and 230, and does have the arm to make every throw that is needed. He is bottom line, a classic drop-back passer with some limited mobility. He has also shown he isn’t afraid to make some challenging throws through tight windows, even with receiving targets like Cecil Shorts and rookie Allen Hurns who, at this point, are neither top receivers on most teams. And getting Denard Robinson involved he has shown some good touch to loft passes out to his backfield as well. Bortles has the skill set to be a good starter in the NFL. Maybe he doesn’t have the cannon for an arm, but he has a good enough arm to make the throws. Blake will be an NFL starter for his career, in my opinion.
While playing in a pro-style offense in Louisville, with far less weapons around him, Teddy is going to be the real deal. He also came in with the availability of some pretty solid offensive weapons around him in Minnesota, and with Norv Turner calling the shots, he will continue to coach up this kid to very high levels. And being that he has been able to make a lot of pre-snap calls and adjustments, in college, he will eventually be a guy in the huddle who makes calls and knows what needs to be done, and had done so this year, at times. Teddy Bridgewater is undoubtedly the best quarterback, from these 3, in my eyes. He has a far higher ceiling with regard to success in the NFL, and I believe he has just begun his career in the NFL. He will be a QB who will make a difference. Bridgewater has slipped into the Vikes system with ease throwing for 2919 YDs, 14 TDs, and 6 wins for his team this season.
 
I look for him to, by far, have the most successful NFL career of the aforementioned rookie QBs.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Who is the most important player for a Cowboys playoff run?

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DeMarco Murray has been beyond phenomenal this year with 1845 rushing yds and 13 scores on the ground. His season has done nothing but build an immense amount of confidence in the teams running game, more so than anytime recently.
 
This season, the Dallas Cowboys have had the 3rd most rushing plays in the entire NFL with 508. Murray has been averaging 24.5 carries/game this season. And a total touches of 28.1 a game. Opposed to last year, when Murray was getting just 15.5 carries/game and 19.3 total touches.
 
His pure dominance has blossomed this year, and has become an elite back in the NFL officially this season. Murray has been producing 100-yard rushing games all year for the Cowboys like clockwork with 12 out of 16 games. Demarco Murray carried the team to the amazing season, with his monster games. DeMarco Murray, is obviously the best season of his career.
 
But Murray’s numbers had plummeted in the month of December. Murray had played “human” in December though. At the end of the season, he was putting up just 3.96 yards/carry. And when playing the Colts he had just 58 yds.
 
Think about how Romo has been able to change his style of play, he doesn’t have to throw the ball constantly, as he has had to do in the past. His attempts/game have dropped significantly, from 40.5 in 2012, down to 29 this year. Murray has taken a lot of the offensive burden from Romo.
 
Tony Romo has overcome a back injury that could have easily landed him on the sideline for weeks on end, and Romo, with his turnover issues that so many were concerned about, has only 9 picks and an astounding 7.8% td passing pct. which led the NFL. And has also been the most accurate he has ever been, at 69.9%.
 
The Cowboys used 3 first-round picks to make their O-line what it is currently. Impressively, they have become a dominant squad that has kept Romo up and opened holes like Emmett Smith used to have back in the 90s.
 
Think about this scenario, if Romo ever happened to go down. Could Brandon Weeden lead this team to a playoff win, let alone a Super Bowl? He has shown what he is, when he had played he was awful earlier this season. Going 24-41 with 2 picks. Romo has put them over the top and will be the one who can keep them over the top in the playoffs.
 
Granted during the year, Murray had to play with a broken hand that was surgically repaired and played poorly against the Colts, Romo, in the same game, when so many may have been questioning what would happen when Murray was so questionable as what he would be capable of, Romo took the Boys on his shoulders and picked it up passing the ball at 18-20 with 4 td strikes.
 
So many football fans have awaited for the December downfall. And yet they went 4-0 in the month, and proved many wrong, outscoring opponents 165-79. The month of December where everyone awaits the crumble and the collapse, Romo’s play had soared, while tearing defenses apart in the month, with 12 tds and just 1 int.
 
With the defense adjustments that teams have to make when playing the Cowboys, it makes them that much more difficult to matchup with on the field. They have built a confidence, that they haven’t had in a long time in Dallas. They can rightfully have a a feeling that they can move the ball anyway they want to now.
 
Tony Romo came off off back surgery, and has had one of his best seasons ever. Think about that, a back surgery, and has thrown for 3705 yds, and 34 tds. Romo is having one of his finest seasons in his 11 year career.
 
Romo has been nothing but terrific this season, and keeping him down will be the biggest key for the opponents of the Cowboys this playoff season. Romo is the cog that keeps the starred helmets clicking on all cylinders. He did it vs Detroit, and he played just fairly, wait until he is forced to kick it in.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Does Chris Johnson have anything to prove, or is there nothing left in the tank?

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The Jets signing Chris Johnson for their backfield comes with a lot of flash. About 5 years ago, he ran for more than 2,000 yards with the Titans, for a blistering 5.6 average per run. And he added 14 TDs as well. He indeed had a pretty amazing season, that left many fans asking about who was the best RB in the league at the time, between him and Adrian Peterson. They picked him up only for a 2 year deal, paying him 8 million. Figure he’s 28 years old, 2 years sounds just about right.

Now with a change of teams, and a new start for him in New York, can he possibly return to his Pro-Bowl form, that many people raved about years ago. Johnson has always been that player who could be a long ball guy, who could take it to the house on any play. He could be their home run threat on the field, firing through the line. When Johnson pounded the ground for his monster season, it was only his second year in the league, and the amazing performance was one of the best single seasons ever for anyone at his position.

Now in New York, he also fits in to help Geno Smith at QB, being that he is a solid receiver as well. And what makes Johnson dangerous is the fact that he is such a dangerous pass-catching RB. He has been grabbing a little over 45 balls out of the backfield per season.

But there are many things going through my head for the Jets this season. The true fact is, they are more than stacked at the running back slot. Chris Ivory is built like a house on his burly and powerful 6 ft 225 lbs frame. He totaled up 833 yards on the ground last season, burrowing through defenses like they were cheese steaks. With an impressive 4.6 avg on the ground. But, he did have injuries that seemed to hound him throughout as well. Many that limited his time on the field. The Jets got by 1530 YDs last season with Chris Ivory and Bilal Powell, as their RBs, combining for a solid 4.3 per carry.

In a way, I think the Jets are hoping for a combination of Johnson and Ivory to take on a Bradshaw and Jacobs role that the Giants had in 2010 When they tore up the league for a combined 2058 YDs and 17 TDs. And again, with his pass catching ability, he could actually line up as a WR as well, or in the slot.

His last year in Tennessee was disastrous, getting buried behind the line of scrimmage almost all the time. Making us ask was his dramatic dip in production due to the knee injury? Or was it his line, or maybe that he isn’t quite the RB that many thought he actually was. Don’t get me wrong, Chris Johnson has great intangibles, he is mobile and is capable of busting off a pretty deep ball, but his power running is weak and he struggles with that tremendously. I’m curious to see how they will work Chris Johnson into their scheme. Johnson definately looks more comfortable when he is able to get to the outside again.

The Jets have been an organization that wallows in a pits of mediocrity. Their front office has been making bad moves and creating issues for seasons upon seasons now. I am sure that Chris Johnson feels confident that the Jets will feed him the ball all season long. And the fact that the OC Marty Mornhinweg likes his style, seems like he will see probably 50% of the carries. I think potentially Johnson can get about 1300 all-purpose YDs, the Jets O-Line is not dominating enough to think can they run the ball strongly 35+ times a game.

I don’t feel he is going to be the man in New York, although he’s athletic and quick, one if his main problems is that he can’t seem to be able to shed tacklers. Plus the fact that the running game has been de-emphasized in the NFL. He isn’t what he thinks he is, in my honest opinion. Numbers don’t lie, changes in scheme is going to be tough, his small size, his speed is only effective is he can get into an open field. I think that he was a good back with incredible speed. He is too small to keep taking the hits week in and week out. At only 195lbs, he keeps taking big hits and struggles to keep coming back.

He has had seasons where he has disappeared, his holdout in 2011, in which he ended up the season with a sad 1047 YDs and 4 TDs. There never has been any legitimate explanation for his falling off the charts, except that he is extremely dependent on his O-line. When he rushed for his massive 2,006 YDs, the Titans offensive line was awesome.

Johnson is an ordinary RB, who had one very special year. In the 5 years since his mega season, he’s averaged only 4.18 yards per carry.

NFL Pre-Season Report part 1

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Contrary to popular opinion there’s money to be made during the NFL preseason. One of the tools I use is my 4D handicapping software in order to develop proven betting systems that have survived the test of time.

As I have stated on several occasions, you shouldn’t just limit yourself to one facet of sports handicapping when wagering your hard earned money. However, I’ve taken the time to share some extremely profitable betting systems during the NFL preseason that can serve you well as a fundamental starting point. All of this information is originated from the 4D software, and only a handful of professional sports handicappers in the country currently possess.

•Any NFL preseason away underdog of 3.5 or less that’s coming off a straight up favorite loss by 10-points or more, versus an opponent coming off a SU&ATS win is 23-4 ATS (85.2%) since 1980.

•Any NFL preseason away underdog of 7.0 or more, versus an opponent coming off a SU&ATS win in which they covered by 5.5 or more, has gone 19-9 ATS (67.9%) since 1980.

•Any NFL preseason away underdog that’s coming off 2 consecutive wins, versus an opponent coming off a win by 10-points or more, has gone 22-6 ATS (78.5%) since 1994.

•Any NFL preseason underdog of 6.5 or more that’s coming off a loss by 10-points or more, versus an opponent coming off a SU&ATS win has gone 20-5 ATS (83.3%) since 1980.

Written by Ross Benjamin of VegasTopDogs.com

Understanding Sports Betting for your Super Bowl Wagers

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The Understanding of Sports Betting in Vegas:

Don’t let the numbers at the sports books confuse you. The Super Bowl is here and some of the pros at VegasTopDogs put together a list of the terms to better understand the basic knowledge of sports betting.  Please take a look at our Sports Dictionary terminology below.

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Football:

How To Read The Betting Odds
If you are new to sports betting online, one of the most confusing things is how the betting odds (also known as betting lines) are displayed.
The majority of bets are referred to in relation to $100. If there is a minus symbol in front of the number (eg -150) then the number refers to how much you must bet in order to win $100. So, for example, if the betting line for this years Super Bowl is -150 you must bet $150 to make a $100 profit. If the betting line is -300 then you must bet $300 to make $100 profit.
If the number is positive (eg +150) then it refers to how much you will win when you bet $100. So, if the betting line is +150 then you will make $150 profit for your $100 bet.
Remember always that you also get your stake back. So, if you bet $100 at +170 and your team wins then you get $170 profit plus your $100 stake back, for a total return of $270.
The fact that everything is expressed in terms of $100 does not mean you need to bet $100 every time. If you bet $10 at +170 then when you win you get $17 profit.

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The Types Of Sports Bets:
On most US sports events, there are three different types of odds available for every event: the side, the money line and the total.
The most simple of these is the money line. The money line bet is simply a bet on who will win the game.
The most popular way to bet is the side, also known as the point spread or line. In order to balance the two teams in the betting, the linesmaker (the person who sets the betting odds) will give the stronger team a handicap to balance the two teams out in the betting. So, using the same example as above with the Broncos and Seahawks meeting in a Super Bowl, the linesmaker have decided that Denver is 3 points superior to the Seahawks.

If you bet on Denver -3 you will get odds of -110 but you only win if the Broncos beat the Seahawks by more than 3 points. If the Broncos win by fewer than 3 or they lose the game, all bets on the Seahawks +3 are winners. If the game is won by Denver by exactly 3 points then that is known as a ‘push’ and all bets are refunded to the players.

The side or point spread is widely used across all American sports and is the most popular form of betting with US bettors.
The total is a bet on how many points in total will be scored by both sides combined in a particular game. Using the Broncos vs Seahawks example again, the linesmaker may decide this game is likely to be very high scoring and set the total at 48. If you think there will be fewer than 48 points in total, you bet on the ‘under’. If you think there will be more, then you bet on the ‘over’. If there are exactly the total number of points then that is a ‘push’ and all bets are refunded.

Sometimes you will see the total line expressed in half points – for example the total might be 48.5. This means it is impossible for there to be a ‘push’ because there is no game where you can score half points – the linesmaker sets the line that way so there is guaranteed to be a result. To bet on football, tell the ticket writer the bet number of the team you wish to bet, with the point spread and the amount you wish to wager. The payout, unless stated otherwise, is figured at odds of 10/11. This means that a wager of $11 would win $10 and return $21.

This is called a straight bet. A straight bet is the most common type of football bet.

The point spread: When betting on football, the team you bet on must “cover the spread.” This means the team must win or not lose by a predetermined margin of points.

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Baseball:

Note: The bottom team is always listed as the home team unless otherwise noted and both of these sports use a moneyline.

The Braves’ odds are -120, meaning a $12 bet would win $10, for a return of $22. The Dodgers’ odds are +110, meaning a $10 bet would win $11, for a return of $21.

On Today’s Line we use a different format, the idea is the same. You will not find the odds for the Underdog. The Underdog’s odds are based on what the casino has for its line. Most use a “Dime Line” or something close to that.

You have just seen an example of a dime line.
Braves -120
Dodgers +110

A 20-cent line would be this below with a difference of 20.
Braves -130
Dodgers +110

Here are two more examples of a dime line and a 20-cent line. See whether you can tell them apart.

Braves -105
Dodgers -105

Braves -120
Dodgers Even-money

You can arrive at the underdog’s price by looking at the favorite’s line. Dime lines are slowly disappearing as sports books look to make a larger profit during what is traditionally the slowest betting season throughout the summer. Several books still offer dime lines.

Money lines change constantly. The listed money line the time you make your bet may be different from the money line when the game starts. The listed line on your ticket is your official odds, unless starting pitcher is changed. This is explained later.

Total: Total runs scored in a game. Also called the over/under.

You may wager that the total score of the game will be more or less than the number listed. It makes no difference which team wins. Simply add the final scores of each team. The payout, unless stated otherwise, is figured at odds of 10/11. (-110)

Note: When betting a total, these rules apply:
(a) The game must go nine innings, or 8 1/2 innings if the home team wins.
(b) Both listed pitchers must start the game.
If either doesn’t happen, the bet is refunded.

All runs scored in extra innings count in over/under bets.

Baseball Run Lines:

The run line: a point spread of 1 1/2 given to a baseball game.

A favorite must win by 2 runs or more, or the underdog must either:
(a) Win the game.
(b) Must lose by only one run.
The payout varies according to the money line odds assigned to each outcome.

Baseball Parlays

You may combine several teams into one wager. All teams must win to win the bet.

Baseball parlays are figured out by calculating the payout for the first game, based on the money line, then applying that amount to the next game, and so-forth.

If a game is postponed for any reason, the parlay reduces by one team. The bet is treated as if the postponed game were never included in the parlay.

Here’s an example of how to figure out a baseball parlay:

Listed pitcher(s) option

When making a baseball bet, you are betting team vs. team. You have the option to specify that either or both listed pitchers must start the game.

Since baseball odds are determined on starting pitchers, any late pitching changes often force an adjustment in the odds. This will increase or decrease the payout on a winning ticket. However, if you list starting pitchers, and your pitcher doesn’t start, then the bet is refunded.


Futures

Sports books offer bettors the opportunity to wager on the outcome of a season — for example, which team will win the Super Bowl or the Stanley Cup or the American League East pennant. This is known as “futures book” or “future book” betting.

As an illustration, let’s look at Super Bowl futures. Sports books list each NFL team with corresponding odds to win the Super Bowl. For example, the Dallas Cowboys may be 5-1, the Redskins 12-1, the Cardinals 100-1, etc. If you place $10 on the Redskins and they go on to win the Super Bowl, you collect $120 plus your $10 back for a total payoff of $130. It does not matter whether your team covers the point spread in the Super Bowl. For the purposes of future book betting, the team has to win only the Super Bowl.

When you make a futures bet, your odds are “locked in.” That means if you bet the Redskins at 12-1, you will get paid off at 12-1 odds, even if the sports book later adjusts the odds (to 6-1, for instance).

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Hockey

To bet on hockey, tell the ticket writer the bet number of the team you wish to bet and the amount you wish to wager. If your team covers the goal spread, you win. The payout is based on a “Money Line”.

The Goal Spread:

When betting on hockey, the team you bet on must “cover the spread.” This means the team must win or not lose by a predetermined margin of goals.

The Money Line: Odds for a game based on $1.00 A “minus” (-) preceding the number indicates the team is a favorite. A “plus” (+) preceding the number indicates the team is an underdog.

Example:

Note: The bottom team is always listed as the home team unless otherwise noted.

The Red Wings are 1 1/2-goal favorites to win. The Red Wings must win the game by at least two goals to be a winner. If you bet on the Sharks, you win your bet if:
(a) The Sharks win the game.
(b) The game ends in a tie.
(c) The Sharks lose the game by not more than 1 goal.

Note: The money line is used in conjunction with the point spread. If the Red Wings win by 2 goals; a $15 bet would win $10 and return $25. If the Sharks win, tie or lose by one goal; a $10 bet would win $13 and return $23.

It is common for a team to be listed as a 1/2-goal favorite and be listed with a +120 price. This means that by giving up 1/2 goal, a $10 bet would win $12 for a return of $22.

Total: Total points scored in a game. Also called the over/under.

You may wager that the total score of the game will be more or less than the number listed. It makes no difference which team covers the spread. Simply add the final scores of each team. The payout, unless stated otherwise, is figured at odds of 10/11 (-110).

Hockey Parlays

You may combine several teams into one wager. All teams must win to win the bet. Hockey parlays are figured out by calculating the payout for the first game, based on the money line, then applying that amount to the next game and so forth.


Horse racing

Thanks to satellite feeds from racetracks around the nation, Las Vegas is a sort of nirvana for horse racing bettors (or “horseplayers,” as they are sometimes called).

Because there are so many tracks to choose from, in Las Vegas race books it is usually necessary to identify which track you want when you place your bet. For example, tell the ticket writer, “Churchill Downs, eighth race, five dollars to win on No. 4.”

Otherwise, betting procedure in the race book is the same as at the track: For you to collect on a “win” bet your horse must win the race, to collect on a “place” bet he must finish first or second, and to collect on a “show” bet he must finish first, second or third.

Betting a horse “across the board” is really three separate bets: one to win, one to place and one to show.

Hitting an “exacta” entails picking the first two finishers in a race in the correct order; a “quinella” is the first two finishers in either order. A “trifecta” is the first three finishers in exact order; a “trifecta box” is the first three in any order. A “superfecta” is the first four finishers in exacta order.

A “daily double” is a wager that calls for picking the winners of two consecutive races. A “daily triple” entails picking the winners of three consecutive races. And a “Pick Six” calls for picking the winners of six consecutive races, an extremely difficult feat that is usually rewarded with an enormous payout.

In Las Vegas, race books frequently offer promotions such as free contests with cash prizes, special house-banked betting pools that grow larger if no one hits them for a few days or horse racing tournaments. Rules and details vary greatly by casino so be sure to shop around to find those that appeal to you.


Propositions:

Nevada sports books are not permitted to accept wagers on presidential elections, the Academy Awards or the winner of the TV show “Survivor.” Some sports books may post odds on these events as a publicity stunt, but these odds are for amusement only. They are not real betting lines.

Under state law, wagers must involve the outcome of “athletic contests” rather than elections or votes of any kind. This means you cannot even bet on who will win awards such as the Most Valuable Player, Rookie of the Year, Cy Young and the like.

Even so, “wacky” proposition bets can sometimes be found in Las Vegas sports books. They are often linked to the Super Bowl or another major sporting event.

For instance, in the Super Bowl gamblers could bet on whether the Broncos would score more points than what the Boston Celtics score in the 1st quarter of their NBA game on Super Bowl Sunday — and that was just one of countless “wacky” propositions.

As another example, to generate interest in Monday Night NFL games, many sports books offer odds on which player will score the first touchdown in the game.

These “wacky” bets can be lots of fun, but odds and details vary tremendously by casino, so read the fine print before getting involved.


Here is a compiled list of sports betting terminology that may help you in Las Vegas with your sports wagering:

Action: A wager of any kind and the total amount of money being wagered on any game. In baseball betting, this means placing a bet regardless of the listed pitchers.

Across the Board: Where (particularly US horse racing) win, place and show pools are offered, this is a bet of equal stakes on each outcome.

Action: A bet or wager of any kind is deemed Action if valid. Different rules apply in different sports in determining if a bet is action or no action (e.g. baseball bets are action when the game gets beyond 41/2innings).

ATS: “Against the Spread”. The outcome of using a point spread. Ex. The Ravens were a -7.5 favorite to win and actually won the game by 8. This means they won “against the spread”.

Bankroll: The total amount of money the bettor plans to gamble with.

Bet: Any wager that is risked on the outcome of any sporting event or any event for that matter.

Blind Bet: A bet made by a racetrack bookmaker to draw other bookmakers’ attention away from his sizeable betting on another horse- and thus to avoid a shortening of the odds on the other horse.

Book: A bookmaker’s tally of amounts bet on each competitor, and odds necessary to assure him of profit.

Bookmaker: A person or company who accepts bets from the public, usually on racing or sports events (also known as a “bookie”).

Buck: A $100 bet.

Chalk: A team or player that is favored to win.

Chalk Player: A player who mostly wagers on favored teams and rarely bets on underdogs.

Circled Game: A game where the maximum bet is reduced and cannot be included in parlays or teasers. Betting action is limited due to uncertainties of key injuries, weather conditions or rumors regarding a team.

Client: Purchaser of betting information from horseman or other tipster.

Cover: To win a bet against the point spread.

Daily Double: A horse racing wager where a player must pick the horses to win in each of two designated races.

Dead Heat: When two horses finish in a tie.

Dime bet: A $1000 wager.

Dog: The team or player predicted to likely lose a game or matchup. The dog always has a + sign on lines and point spreads. Also known as the underdog.

Dog Player: A bettor who usually bets on underdogs.

Dollar Bet: A $100 wager.

Double Action: An “if bet” that is processed if the precedent bet wins, ties or cancels.

Edge: An advantage.

Even Money: A wager on which neither side lays any juice or vigorish. The odds are even for both teams.

Exacta: The first two horses to place in a race.

Exotic Wager: A bet such as first half, second half, futures, run lines or money line wagers.

Exposure: The amount of money the bookmaker will risk losing on a game or race.

Favorite: The team or player expected to win an event. The odds reflect the extent to which the choice is favored.

First Half Wager: A bet placed on only the first half of a game.

Form Player: A bettor who makes selections from past-performance records.

Furlong: A unit of distance used in horse racing equal to 1/8 of a mile or 220 yards.

Futures: Odds posted on an event or outcome taking place some time in the future, such as the Super Bowl, World Series, the Stanley Cup and the NBA Championship.

Gross Win: The amount of winnings before subtracting the expenses.

Grand Salami: The grand total of goals scored in all hockey games of the day. It can be wagered to go Over or Under the total.

Half Time Bet: A bet placed only on the second half of the game. ( Includes Overtime).

Handicapper: One who handicaps, studies, rates and wagers on sporting events or horse races.

Handicapping: Studying and predicting the outcome of sporting events.

Handle: The total amount of bets taken.

Hedging: Placing a bet on the opposite side in order to cut losses or guarantee a profit from the same previous wager.

Hook: A half-point in point spreads.

Hot Game: A game that draws a significant amount of action on one side by professional handicappers.

In the Money: Describes the horses in a race that finish 1st, 2nd and 3rd (and sometimes 4th) or the horses on which money will be paid to bettors, depending on the place terms.

Juice: The bookmaker’s commission, also known as vigorish or “The Vig”.

Laying points: Betting the favorite by giving up points.

Laying the price: Betting on the favorite by laying money line odds.

Limit: The maximum amount a bookmaker will allow you to bet before he changes the odds and/or the points.

Lines: The current odds or point spread on any particular sporting event.

Linemaker: The person who establishes the original and subsequent betting lines.

Listed Pitchers: When betting on baseball, a wager placed that pitchers scheduled to start a game, actually start. If they don’t, the bet is voided.

Lock: A sure winner.

Longshot: A team or horse unlikely to win or have a chance at winning. (e.g. 100 to 1)

Middle: To win both sides of the same betting proposition. Betting the favorite team at -2 1/2 with one sportbook and then taking +3 1/2 with another one. The game ends up with the favorite winning by exactly 3 points, you have then “middle the game”. A favorite betting method of “wise guys”.

Moneyline: Odds expressed in terms of money. The amount you must bet to win 100 in favorites or the amount you win on underdogs. Whenever there is a (-) minus you lay that amount to win a hundred dollars, where there is a plus (+) you receive that amount for every hundred dollars wagered.

Morning Line: Forecast of probable odds

Move The Line: A player pays an additional price to receive a half-point or more in his favor on a pointspread.

Mutuel Pool: Total amount bet to win, place or show in a race. Also total amount bet on daily double, exacta, quinella, etc…

Nickel: A $500 wager.

Nickel Line: A line where the juice is 5%.

No Action: A bet in which no money is won or lost. A cancelled or voided wager.

Odds: Odds are the bookmaker’s view of the chance of a competitor winning (adjusted to include a profit).

Odds-Against: Where the odds are greater than evens (e.g. “5 to 2”).

Odds Compiler The person working for the bookmaker who sets the odds following research and his own feelings.

Off the Board: A game on which bets are no longer accepted.

Off-Track: Betting conducted away from the track.

Official Lines: The line that the sports books use for wagering purposes.

Overlay: When the odds of a given propositon are more in favor of the bettor than the house.

Over/Under: The combined scores of both teams competing in a game being wagered on. Betting whether the total score will be over or under the expected posted total.

Parlay: A single bet including two or more teams in which all teams must win or cover for the bettor to win and receive higher payouts.

Perfecta: In horse racing, a wager in which the player selects the two horses in a race to finish in 1st and 2nd places in exact order.

Pick’em Game: A game which neither team or betting option is the favorite. Also called a “pick”.

Place: A horse racing wager in which a horse finishes first or second.

Pleasers: A pleaser is a group of NFL side straight bets combined into one bet.

Pointspread: A form of handicapping in which oddsmakers predict how many points one team needs against another in order to even out the public betting on a particular game.

Press: To bet or wager a larger amount than usual.

Price: The odds or pointspread.

Push: A pointspread that ties or combined scores of the two teams that tie the total.

Proposition Bet: A wager on a particular aspect of a game, such as how many touchdowns will be scored, etc.

Quinella: In horse racing, a wager in which the player selects the two horses in a race to finish in 1st and 2nd places in any order.

Reverse: In horse racing, to ask for a second exacta wager which specifies two horses in reverse order of the first exacta wager.

Round Robin: A series of three or more teams in 2-team parlays.

Run Down: A line update. All the lines for a specific date, sport, time, etc.

Run Line: In baseball, a spread used instead of a moneyline. Usually set at 1½ either way.

Scratch: In horse racing, a horse that has been withdrawn from a race before the start. Wagers on this horse are voided.

Show: A horse racing bet in which you collect if the horse finishes first, second or third.

Sides: The names of the two teams playing: the underdog and the favorite.

Sided: When one side of a betting proposition wins and opposite side ties.

Single: A bet on a single result or outcome.

Single Action: An “if bet” that is processed only if the precedent bet wins.

Spread: An abbreviated form or another word for a point spread.

Square: Unsophisticated or unknowlegable gambler.

Straight Bet: A bet on one team or player.

Taking the points: Betting on the underdog and taking the advantage in the point spread.

Taking the price: Betting an underdog and accepting money odds.

Teaser: A bet on two or more teams where the line on each team is adjusted in the favor of the bettor by a fixed number of additional points. Like a parlay bet, all selections must be correct for the teaser to win.

Ticket: Any Wager.

Total: The combined number of points scored by both teams during a game, including overtime.

Totals Bet: A bet in which the bettor speculates that the total score of both teams will be more or less than the line posted.

Trifecta: A horse racing bet in which a player selects three horses in one race to finish first, second and third in exact order.

Under: A bet in which the total points scored by two teams will be under a certain amount.

Underdog: The team perceived to likely end up losing. The team given points in a pointspread.

Value: Getting the best available odds on a betting proposition.

Vigorish: The commission paid to the Sportbooks.

Wager: Any bet.

Win: The term used to describe a 1st place finish.

Winning Margin: A bet to predict the winning margin of one team over another.

Wise Guy: A well-informed and knowledgeable handicapper or bettor.

Written for VegasTopDogs.com who feature the Best Professional Sports Handicappers in the World. These Handicappers featured on VTD have made millions with their offshore contacts and WiseGuy connections in the sports betting industry throughout their career. Check out all of their BIG GAMES and special package deals now!

Top 10 NFL Coaches of all time

Noll

It can be argued continually the decisions that are made on NFL head coaches and who should or shouldn’t be on the elite list of generals. Today we will go over a very individual list of VTDs top 10 NFL head coaches.

We will take an in-depth look at the top 10 greatest in NFL history in my opinion. Taking various things into affect, including wins, strategies, what they did for the game, and of course, success.

Let’s take a look at the list of men who led their teams in battle week after week, the general of their army.

10- Marv Levy; All time Wins 143 Playoff wins 11

Superbowl wins 0

Growing up I always saw him as the “old man on the sidelines.” Always screaming, but little did I comprehend he was one of the best. He brought the Buffalo Bills to 4 straight Super bowls, which is unheard of. He at all times kept teams moving with his no huddle offensive style. The winningest coach in Bills history.

9- Jimmy Johnson; All time Wins 80 Playoff wins 9

Superbowl wins 2

With his helmet like hair he changed the game for generations. Although his coaching periods were not nearly as long as some of the others, he made magic happen. Known generally for his years with the Cowboys, he quickly turned the ‘Boys around from 1-15, to instantaneous contenders, and his self-assurance and smarts with building a team, 1 of only 6 men to coach consecutive Superbowl winners.

8- Mike Shanahan; All time Wins 167 Playoff wins 8

Superbowl wins 2

Not one of the most pleasing men on the league, but what he has done has been great, also leading his team to consecutive Superbowl championships. The Broncos, between 1996-1998, went 39-9 in that 3 year span. Always known for getting a monster running game from his backs, he always made it come to pass.

7- Bill Walsh; All time Wins 92 Playoff wins 10

Superbowl wins 3

The trendsetter of the West Coast offense, he changed football eternally. A style that almost every team has played at one time or another, or is playing. Bill Walsh won 6 division titles, 3 NFC championships. 2 time NFL coach of the year. He brought the Niners to championship team in just 2 seasons.

6- Tom Landry; All time Wins 250 Playoff wins 20

Superbowl wins 2

Before my time, his legend, his hat and his numbers speak for themselves. Period. Firstly, the fact that he coached one team for 29 seasons is amazing. And even more 20 consecutive winning seasons, think about that for a bit. 13 divisional titles and his 270 total wins are 3rd most all time.

5- Bill Parcells; All time Wins 172 Playoff wins 11

Superbowl wins 2

The big tuna, another character I was never liked much but knew how to put things together for a team. Getting 2 different teams to the Superbowl in his career, he made the Giants relevant, after numerous shabby seasons, he only had 2 losing season there. Made the Pats significant after almost a decade, when at the Cowboys, he turned them around, 1st Head Coach to lead 4 singular teams to the playoffs.

4- Bill Belichek; All time Wins 187 Playoff wins 18

Superbowl wins 3

With his curmudgeonly disgruntled style he has been to the playoffs 10 times with the Patriots. He has a mind-boggling winning percentage with the Pats at .726. He truly is a mastermind who knows how to get the job done.

3- Don Shula; All time Wins 328 Playoff wins 19

Superbowl wins 2

Legendary coach has been extremely successful in his iconic career. For 26 seasons, where he won 10+ games with Miami 16 times, and of course his celebrated 1972 team that went 14-0 and is still the standard for perfection, that teams wordlessly would all love to accomplish.

2- Joe Gibbs; All time Wins 154 Playoff wins 17

Superbowl wins 3

Joe Gibbs made the Washington Redskins a dominant force for many many seasons. He coached them for 12 seasons, getting to the playoffs 8 times, 4 NFC championship games. Pounding the ball was his style with an intense offense, getting the best of his players; he in no way won a Superbowl with a statistical beast QB at the helm.

1- Chuck Noll; All time Wins 193 Playoff wins 16

Superbowl wins 4

Coached the Pittsburgh Steeler from 1969 – 1991, and had an incredible run there. Chuck Noll without a doubt is an extremely smart man, who established his team off of fundamentals. He always had vitally sound teams, and pressed it strong for potential generations of coaches.

Written by Mike Anthony of VegasTopDogs.com

Add Some Variety To Your NFL Football Betting Picks

Seattle

Football usually takes center stage here, and it still does even though the college season is over and there are just four teams left in the NFL. But there is more to look for in your online sportsbook. Here are a couple of football matchups, and three more options you should check out.

New England Patriots @ Denver Broncos – Sunday, 3:00 PM ET

The Pats came back to stun the Broncos after spotting them 24 points in the regular season, but now the Broncos will be at home, where they have lost once this year. Can Peyton Manning improve on a dismal head-to-head record against Tom Brady with a trip to the Super Bowl on the line? This AFC title game figures to be something else.

San Francisco 49ers @ Seattle Seahawks – Sunday, 6:30 PM ET

The NFC could be just as good as these two West teams split a pair of meetings in the regular season with the home team winning each time. They also don’t like each other very much; the animosity is very real between the 49ers and the Seahawks, from the head coaches (remember, Jim Harbaugh and Pete Carroll went at it in college before moving on to the NFL).

Golden State Warriors @ Oklahoma City Thunder – Friday, 9:30 PM ET

Not only are these two contenders in the tough Western Conference in the NBA, they are also two of the most exciting teams to watch in the entire league. Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry are superstars in this league and can score from basically anywhere past the halfcourt line, and both teams rank in the top 10 in terms of points scored, so this should be fun to watch.

Montreal Canadiens @ Toronto Maple Leafs – Saturday, 7:00 PM ET

It is always an occasion when these two Original Six rivals meet, and the Maple Leafs are falling back of the pack as they are eight points behind the Habs at the beginning of the week. Montreal is powered from the back by a pair of newly-minted Canadian Olympians in reigning Norris Trophy winner P.K. Subban and Carey Price, with the latter being slated to be the #1 goalie in Sochi. This isn’t a must-win for Toronto, but they can’t afford to fall much further in the East.

Lucien Bute vs. Jean Pascal – Saturday, 10:00 PM ET

The Canadiens won’t be playing at the Bell Centre on Saturday, which frees up the arena for a boxing match of epic proportions, and likely the biggest in Canadian history. Bute and Pascal are native sons of Montreal and will go toe-to-toe for the WBC Diamond belt in this light heavyweight bout, and even though Bute made his name at 168 pounds, he has proven to be adept at 175 as well. Can he bring his knockout power up to 175 pounds to take down Pascal, the former WBC titleholder at light heavyweight? This could be an incredible match on Saturday night on HBO.

Written by WagerWeb.ag for VegasTopDogs.com

What Sports to Watch and Bet On This Week

nfl-playoffs-collage-jan-7

There is NBA and NCAA basketball on the agenda this week, as well as the NHL. But we will start with the NFL playoffs, where the spotlight will be under center as it usually is.

Quarterback Play Will Be Huge In The NFL Playoffs

Russell Wilson leads Seattle as 9-point home favorites against Drew Brees and New Orleans on Saturday, while the nightcap has Tom Brady and New England as 7.5-point favorites at home against Andrew Luck and Indianapolis. On Sunday, Colin Kaepernick and San Francisco are 2-point road favorites against Cam Newton and Carolina, while the schedule wraps up with Peyton Manning and Denver as 10-point favorites at home against Philip Rivers and San Diego, who won in Denver in Week 15.

The Heat Take Over New York

The two-time defending champions from Miami have a trip to New York lined up, and they should be favorites on the road on Thursday, when they face the Knicks and Friday, when they take on the Nets in Brooklyn. No teams in the NBA have been as disappointing (and that is being generous) as the New York clubs, although the Nets had won three in a row as of Tuesday.

Can Carolina Pull Off Another Upset?

You have no idea what you’ll get with North Carolina so far in this NCAA hoops season as they have knocked off the likes of Louisville, Kentucky and Michigan State, but then they will lose to Wake Forest. The Tar Heels could be underdogs on the road at Syracuse on Saturday in their first meeting with the #2 Orangemen as ACC foes.

American Teams Anchor Loaded NHL Saturday Night

Saturday night is the big night in the NHL week, and this Saturday, the American teams take the spotlight in a pair of late-night matchups. Boston is in San Jose in one showdown, while Detroit faces off with Los Angeles. Look for the home teams to be favored here.

Written for WagerWeb.ag

Is Jay Cutler the long-term answer in Chicago?

Cutler

Jay Cutler at QB for the Bears has always been an engrossing story to say the least. Cutler has been known for his pouty, temperamental ways and his nearly maddening gifted, and nimble game as much as his big arm, and gunslinger mindset but in the same sentence, he has also been disappointing to many.

For Bears fans, let’s bring them back a bit, shall we? They recently signed Cutler to a long term 7 year contract, solidifying him as their starting QB likely until his retirement. The question immediately rises, can the Bears win it all with Cutler leading the team downfield? But look at the alternatives they had, 1st and foremost, they had to sign him. Who else did they need out there? They weren’t going to draft a QB this year, not happening, and what other QBs were out there to pick up, and largely why would they?

The Chicago Bears had the 2nd best offense in the NFL this season. Why? Because of Jay Cutler, that’s why. There is no reason to muddle with a machine on offense the way they ran this year, scoring 28 a game, and Cutler throwing 19 TDs, while missing 5 games on the season, they did pretty good, I would say. The Bears seemed to ultimately give him some time to pass the ball out to his WRs, and they scored 24 or more 10 times on the season, including 6 times 30+ again not so bad.

Let’s be honest here, there are a lot of other teams that would have paid him just as much, if not more to join their teams. He can be a QB who people dislike, with his emotions, and his mannerisms. But his team plays for him, and really in the end, isn’t that what matters most, if your team plays for you, and you keep the team moving forward isn’t that really what its about?

The Bears have had their best QB in what seems like forever, before Cutler, the last QB to throw for 3600 or more in a season, which Jay did in 2009, was in 1995 with Erik Kramer. How about the last 27 TD passing QB, that would be also Erik Kramer in 95. Cutler in his 5 years with Bears, he has tossed 101 TDs, to 75 picks, in the 5 years before the big Cutler decision, their QBs put up 82 TDs, to 88 picks. I would say Jay developed the team, evidently.

This Bears team has been one of the top notch offenses the Bears have ever had. With an offense having a franchise running back, in Matt Forte, 3 outstanding receiving targets and an ever improving offensive line. Bottom line, Jay was not the trouble in Chi-town this year. When he was 1st brought into Chicago, the team had no direction, they were a struggling squad, supported with 3 QBs in 3 years. He was standing behind an offensive line, that allowed him to get buried 110 times in his 1st 3 years there. Yet he still threw for 226/game under ridiculous pressure, and constant scrambling and running around to make a play. Chicago needs Jay Cutler, they, like several other teams in the NFL are a QB away from greatness, they have a QB who can be a 30/15 guy with 4000 yds, I seriously have no doubts.

They need to fix the actual problem.

They will go on to be good on offense, they need to instantly fix the defense. Which needs complete renovation, from top to bottom. The Bears offense is set with excellent pieces for the next few seasons, they need to rebuild that defense. Pick up a few draft picks, swing a couple trades and they could make some noise. It wasn’t Cutlers fault that the defense left Randall Cobb uncovered and wide open vs Green Bay with the game ticking away.

A Cutler-led offense with monster WR Brandon Marshall, sure handed, future Pro-bowler Alshon Jeffery, Martellus Bennett, who has been an ace and ultimate utility back, Matt Forte isn’t the problem, obviously. Make us believers Jay, shut up the naysayers, show them all what you can do. Give Chicago fans something to believe in. Cutler is a good quarterback. Who has a offensive line now bringing stability on the team’s offense.

Written by TonyK of VegasTopDogs.com

Is there overhyping of Andrew Luck?

Luck

This season, Andrew Luck has had various people judge him a bit with more skepticism than typical. Unsure if it’s because of skills, expectations, or maybe because he almost lost at home to Terrell Pryor, and lost at home to 2012 8th overall pick, and an unsteady QB RyanTannehill.

He has been throwing the ball with spotty accuracy, hitting 59 % on the season, 236 his yards/game are at an unusually low end. Which after his rookie season of 273/ game, one would be led to believe this number would have been much better this season.

At home, in Lucas Oil Stadium, where the team is supposed to be dominant, being led by their general, Luck has been exceptional, winning 75% of his games, going back to last season. This year, so far has been satisfactory in the dome. Throwing for 261/game in home turf. On the road it has been another story, where his number drops significantly, with poor accuracy and only 214 passing yards/ game.

The season has been slippery, for him, losing Reggie Wayne after only 7 games, when he was still his absolute number 1 WR, getting 8 targets/ game, and hauling in 72 YPG. He was likely on his way to a 80+ catch, 1100+ yard year, for the 35 year old wide out. Lucks targets now include T.Y. Hilton as his WR1, his WR2 is Darrius Heyward-Bey, with a puny 10 YPC. Then we have the running situation, with recently benched, Trent Richardson, and his massive 2.8 YPC, which I would believe most would say has not worked out as a great deal for Indianapolis. I would conceive Cleveland feels pretty OK with that deal. So he still has some limited options to move the ball down field.

Luck has the innate leadership that one expects from their QB, with 10 game winning drives in 27 career games, so the kid has the clutch gene. And he does win big games, as he has done this year vs San Fran, Seattle, and Denver, throwing for only 205/ game in those games, but he also threw 5 TDs and 0 ints in those games as well.

Andrew Luck has been fine this season, leading his team to great wins over some top competition. We all hype up the next generation of players, no matter what the sport, sometimes a bit too much. In this case, I don’t believe he has been over hyped, at all. He came in with astronomically huge expectations on his shoulders, and has lived up to them in my opinion. Yes, are there things he still needs to improve on, like his accuracy and road play, of course, but lets also remember the seemingly outrageous time frame of the “old school” 3-4 years it generally takes a QB to adjust to the NFL game.

In a day and age where if a rookie QB isn’t dominating in the first 5 games, it seems they get knocked on and torn apart by the media like sheep in a wolves den. Andrew has a total of 27 games below his belt, and a 67% winning pct. I would have to say, he’s doing quite alright. Its good to be a Colts fan.

Written by TonyK of VegasTopDogs.com